Ireland and particle physics research – The Irish Times

Sir, – We would like to warmly congratulate Alain Aspect, John Clauser and Anton Zeilinger, the three winners of this year’s well-deserved Nobel Prize in Physics.

Ireland should also be proud of this recent award. Although none of the three recipients (Aspect, Clauser and Zeilinger) are Irish or based in Ireland, they are indeed an Irish Nobel laureate. According to the official press release, the prize was awarded “for experiments with entangled photons, establishing the violation of Bell’s inequalities and pioneering quantum information science.” Their work would not have been possible without the pioneering predictions of Irish theoretical physicist John Stewart Bell, who was born in Belfast in 1928 and sadly died aged 62. His work was of such importance that if he had lived he would undoubtedly have received his own Nobel Prize, and this award, with its many references to Bell and his work, is recognition of that fact.

John Bell spent most of his career at the particle physics center of CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva, until his untimely death in 1990. Ireland is not a member of CERN, what we think is a strategic mistake for Ireland, and we urge the Irish government to at least become an associate member.

John Bell’s work has profound implications for the future of quantum computing, quantum cryptography, quantum information, and modern communications. During his time at CERN, he also made other important contributions to particle physics, which are currently being verified at CERN, and are playing an increasingly important role in condensed matter physics, which underlies science. semiconductor industry. Unfortunately, if he had been born in the Republic of Ireland, he would probably never have gone to CERN. – Yours, etc.,

DENJOE

O’CONNOR, ARIM

head teacher,

School of theory

Physics,

Dublin Institute

for advanced studies;

Brian Dolan,

Honorary Professor,

Department of

theoretical physics,

Maynooth University

Assistant Professor,

School of theory

Physics,

Dublin Institute

for higher education,

Dublin 2.

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